Coasterpedia
Log in

Star Jet (Casino Pier)

Click here to watch the on-ride POV

Enjoy the ride!
roller coaster
Star Jet
Star Jet (Casino Pier) in the ocean.jpg
Star Jet in February 2013.
USA.png
Casino Pier
Location Seaside Heights, New Jersey, USA
Status Defunct
Operated 2002 to 2012
Statistics
Manufacturer E&F Miler Industries
Type Steel
Model / product Hi-Miler
Riders per train 6
Propulsion Chain lift hill
Height52 feet
Inversions0
Help - Infobox 3

Star Jet was an E&F Miler Industries sit-down roller coaster located at Casino Pier in Seaside Heights, New Jersey, USA. It was destroyed when Hurricane Sandy struck on October 29, 2012.

History[edit]

The Star Jet opened in 2002. It's name was inspired by the Jet Star roller coaster, which previously stood in Star Jet's location.

On October 29, Hurricane Sandy hit the New Jersey coast and partially destroyed the boardwalk, sending the Star Jet into the Atlantic ocean. About a month after, on November 26, the mayor of Seaside Heights said he had been talking with coast guards about keeping the roller coaster where it was, saying it would be a "great tourist attraction".[1] Shortly after however, the mayor admits that keeping the roller coaster “was not the brightest comment.”

On January 8, 2013, a 38-year old man was arrested for climbing on the remains of the Star Jet. Christopher Angelo supposedly canoed out and climbed to the top of the coaster with three days worth of supplies. He then took out an American flag and placed it on the roller coaster. He said to a news channel that he was trying to raise awareness for shore recovery[2]

Timelapse of the dismantling of Sar Jet.

After sitting in the ocean for nearly seven months, the Star Jet was finally demolished on May 23, 2013. Although the ride was scrapped, a piece of track was kept to serve as a memorial.[3]

Design[edit]

Trains[edit]

3 cars per train. In each car, riders are arranged 2 across in a single row for a total of 6 riders per train.

Name[edit]

The name is not a typo. This ride is named because it replaced the similarly-named Jet Star.

References[edit]